info@spnanyc.org

Toni Boornazian

Visit from an Old Friend

Thank You Christy Dailey and Chris Carlone

SPNA wants to thank Christy Dailey, who was a gardener in Stuyvesant Square from 2007-2008, for keeping Stuyvesant Park in her thoughts. She went on to start her own business, christygardens, but always had a special connection to our park.

When the moratorium on volunteering in the park was lifted this past summer, Christy came to volunteer and helped get the Peter Stuyvesant bed (which she had designed) back in shape.

And now, Christy donated and planted 250 tulip bulbs and 25 Leucojum with her assistant Chris Carlone (shown above).

Christy Dailey is a true lover of Stuyvesant Square!

Read more

Hawks

Our Winged Neighbors

Hawks are birds of prey in the Accipitridae (“to seize”) family, which consists of birds of varied sizes and behavior that all have strong, hooked bills. They are found throughout the world, because they easily adapt to multiple environments and climates. Overall, they prefer open spaces, such as grasslands and valleys, where they can easily see and swoop down to seize their prey. Because hawks are so widely spread out, they are opportunistic hunters, and will devour all sorts of small animals, such as mice, lizards, fish, and rabbits. Their excellent vision, which is eight times stronger than that of a human, and their keen instinct make them effective hunters. As adults, they have no natural predators, but the young and eggs can be eaten by owls, raccoons, foxes, and other animals.

Red-tailed hawks (shown in our park in the four images above) are the most commonly found hawks in North America, including New York City. They have rounded wings that span up to four feet across, yellow legs and feet, rich brown outer feathers, a beige underbelly, and a short reddish-brown tail from which they get their name. The females are generally 25% larger than the males, and they can live from 12 to 30 years. Red-tailed hawks have a symbiotic relationship with the City. They provide pest control, while buildings and bridges provide great nesting areas and high perches from which to spot prey. Although it may be tempting to approach these majestic birds, people are advised to admire them from afar and not feed them. Killing, capturing, trading, or transporting these birds are illegal, per the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. The goal is to coexist without infringing on each other’s personal space, which is no small feat in New York City.

Totem Pole in Cape Mudge Village, c. 1919-1924, British Columbia, National Museum of the American Indian, NMAI-134_pht_001_P06408

Beginning in early Mark, red-tailed hawks mate through grand aerial courtship displays. The male repeatedly flies up high, then steeply plummets downward toward the female, offering and enticing her with prey, occasionally interlocking talons in mid-air and spiraling toward the ground before eventually pulling away. After the display, both hawks will perch, groom one another, and then mate. In early April, the female will lay one to five eggs. Both parents take turns incubating the eggs for 28 to 35 days until they are ready to hatch. They then care for the young for up to six weeks until they are ready to fly, hunt, and leave the nest. It is common for hawks to live in the same place year after year with the same partner.

Fragment of Temple Relief, 664-332 B.C.E., Egypt, Brooklyn Museum 37.1357E

Many cultures associate certain symbols and characteristics with hawks. Courage, perspicacity, and intelligence are all associated with these birds. A passage in the Book of Job describes their sophisticated migration and behavior as being ordained by God. Hawks are considered guardians and messengers in Norse, Greek, and Egyptian mythology, and in the traditions of native peoples in North and South America. Totem poles made by indigenous peoples may have a hawk perched at the top, symbolizing power and seeing situations from a higher perspective. Hawk feathers continue to be used in religious rituals and in regalia, and are included in the Eagle Feather Law, allowing only federally recognized tribes to obtain feathers and continue their customs.

Headdress, 1962, Made by the Rikbaktsa, Brazil, Penn Museum 89-1-16

Red-tailed hawks frequently stop over in our park. Next time you visit, look up. You might just find our feathered neighbor perched high on a branch, ready to swoop down on a moment’s notice.

You can learn more about hawks and other birds of prey in New York State by clicking here.

Read more

New Plans for Our Neighborhood

Get Involved

In 2023, Mount Sinai Beth Israel will sell two large properties flanking Stuyvesant Park: 1 and 10 Nathan Perlman Place (in yellow below) in order to reduce operating costs and increase specialization across facilities. This transaction will be one of the largest sales of real estate in Manhattan.

Community Board 6 (CB6) wants to ensure the sale of this property and any future operations will benefit the residents of the neighborhood, maintaining these areas as a community asset. The organization is urging everyone in the neighborhood to become involved in a comprehensive community visioning process to ensure the work is representative and inclusive. To learn more about this sale, sign up for meetings, and have your voice heard, visit https://perlman.cbsix.org/.

Read more

Leaves, Leaves, and More Leaves

Thank You Josie DeJesus and SPDogs

Stuyvesant Park’s resident dog owners (SPDogs) teamed up with NYC Parks’ Josie DeJesus to take on the huge task of clearing all of the fall leaves in the park. The leaves were raked and ushered into tens of large bags, and they will be used for mulching and composting. We thank Josie and SPDogs for working hard to maintain our park for all of our neighbors and furry friends.

Read more

Campaign to Save Our English Elms

Goal Reached!

Thank you everyone that donated to our campaign to Save Our English Elm Trees! Your generosity raised over $7,000 and has made it possible for us to pay for the critical professional help these 100-year-old trees need to remain healthy for all to enjoy. We also are grateful to Partnership for Parks, which matched up to $2,500 of your donations. The work will take place over the winter, so we can look forward to the elms looking their best this coming spring.

Read more